African Paintings by African American Artist (Black Artists)

Black_Musician

African Paintings from African American Artist (Black Artists)

We sell BlackArt oil paintings that are hand painted on canvas. These beautiful originals are inexpensive yet inspiring. Black Artists, african paintings, black art, blackart, black artists,african american artist, african paintings,african american artists... We have them all.

They are shipped to you un-stretched in a tube. Thank you for looking. Timothy Kuchar.

 

tn_20_640x480_16.JPG 20"x24" Black 4 men in band
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95
tn_20_640x480_11.JPG 20"x24" Black colorful ladies
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95
tn_20_640x480_13.JPG 20"x24" Black couple dancing
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95
tn_20_640x480_17.JPG 20"x24" Black man and woman singing
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95
tn_20_640x480_07.JPG 20"x24" Black man horn and piano
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95
tn_20_640x480_15.JPG 20"x24" Black man on piano
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95
tn_20_640x480_05.JPG 20"x24" Black man with drums
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95
tn_20_640x480_09.JPG 20"x24" Black man with horn
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95
tn_20_640x480_10.JPG 20"x24" Black man with sax
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95
tn_20_640x480_12.JPG 20"x24" Black nude in bed sitting
Price: $180.00
On Sale! $49.95

THE HISTORY OF BLACK ARTISTS

Black art has a rich, vibrant history. The first known African American artists were the slave artisans. These artisans had skills such as cabinetmakers, quilt makers, stoneware vessel makers, ironworkers and silversmiths. They were most often asked by their slave masters to create the aforementioned items for their households. However, they were occasionally allowed to create some of these items for use in their own homes. Also, some African American artists would paint portraits of white families.

Starting in 1773, Henry Reason of Philadelphia, William Simpson of Boston, and Julien Hudson of New Orleans were just a few of the African American artists that were well known for their african paintings of both black and white prominent subjects.

Unfortunately, in 19th century America, talented Black artists were not yet allowed to join art academies where they could receive special training to enhance their skills. Rarely, certain white families would provide information and resource to these budding artists to help them succeed.

From 1865 to the early 1920’s, after the Civil War, many black artists began to receive recognition for their beautiful works of blackart. Some of the well known African American artists from this time period were Grafton Tyler Brown, Edmonia Lewis and Nelson A. Primus, just to name a few. Around this time, training for the african american artist became more widely available in U.S. cities such as Providence, Boston, Chicago, New Orleans, and Philadelphia. However, they were still at this point largely limited because the market at this time called mainly for art that reflected European influences.

Rome, Munich, and especially Paris were soon discovered to be great places for African American artists to go that were seeking more freedom in their artistic endeavors, as these places seemed to gladly and easily overlook the color of the artists skin.

In the early 1920’s, a movement called the Harlem Renaissance took place. This was a huge step in the right direction for an African American artist living in New York during that time. This is because they were finally starting to get some real respect and recognition for their artistic talents, right there in the United States. This was wonderful news to all black artists, but especially to those who hadn’t been able to afford to go to Europe. From 1919 to around 1929, Harlem, New York was a real happening place to be for those who wanted to submerse themselves in the black arts. Many African American artists became very well known during this time. There were visual artists such as James Van Der Zee, Aaron Douglas, and Palmer Hayden. There were also many musical artists that played a huge role in the Harlem Renaissance such as Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington. There were also quite a few black poets and writers during this time who also enjoyed sharing their talent with the world.

In 1926, the Harmon Foundation was established. William E. Harmon was a real estate magnet who believed in promoting justice for black Americans. He aided in creating exhibitions for black artists to showcase their work, which in turn helped to make the black artist more socially acceptable.

Today’s African American artist produces every type of art imaginable from contemporary modern paintings, to sculptures, to drawing, to photography and beyond.